34 Responses

  1. David Fisher
    David Fisher at |

    Lipstick on a pig.

    Reply
  2. Joseph m
    Joseph m at |

    Good article and really nice looking cabin. Major I’m provement. I’m not sure I understand the sentence “Ultimately Bombardier recognizes that the cabin it previously delivered on the CRJ700, CRJ900 and CRJ1000 came up short compared to Bombardier.”
    Is that a typo?

    Reply
  3. geoff
    geoff at |

    Add the ability for the 200’s to accept a standard rollerboard and we’re talking. Checking it in the jetway is lame.

    Reply
  4. henry LAX
    henry LAX at |

    it doesn’t even have to be THIS fancy. I’ve recently flown on a LX CS100 plane, and that interior put every single E175 to shame.

    but honestly, the airlines loved E75 purely because of the stupid arbitrary 76-seat scope clauses of the US regionals in which the E75 fit it like a glove. In terms of pax comfort, I can hardly tell between CRJ900 and the E75/E90.

    Reply
  5. DaninMCI
    DaninMCI at |

    I don’t mind the regional jets but my complaint is the tight economy seats (leg room) and slim line uncomfortable seats with poor butt padding. To me this is all about the airline choices on how to configure them. The overhead space can be bad on different models. When I’m on a CRJ in a bad seat I always go to my “happy place” in my mind and imagine how I would configure the same plane for private jet use ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  6. Bruce Kane
    Bruce Kane at |

    The only good CR2 is one that’s been turned into beer cans.

    Reply
  7. Corey Terrell
    Corey Terrell at |

    No, it cannot.

    Reply
  8. Shane Martin
    Shane Martin at |

    Negative Ghost Rider

    Reply
  9. Seth Miller
    Seth Miller at |

    Haters gonna hate. :p

    The CR2s are pretty much done. Bombardier admits that. But the CR7/CR9s are going to be around a while yet. Anything to make them even a tiny bit better is to be appreciated, though I agree that just how much a difference this will make is up to debate.

    Reply
  10. Sean Colahan
    Sean Colahan at |

    Can’t change the width of the cabin. 1 point E175/190

    Reply
  11. Joshua Sauberman
    Joshua Sauberman at |

    I prefer my CRJ’s with the dog biscuits pre-ground into my seat.

    Reply
  12. Steven Sullivan
    Steven Sullivan at |

    This doesn’t fix the major problems with those aircraft, which are all related to the fuselage diameter. The Embraer large RJs are still more comfortable regardless of what Bombardier does because of that.

    Reply
  13. u600213
    u600213 at |

    CRJ700 should have 2 lav’s as a mandatory config. One in front, one in back.

    Then switch to a larger diameter or elliptical fusalage or make it 1+1 in F and 1+2 in Y and I’d consider it. Otherwise it will remain on my try to avoid list

    Reply
  14. Charles M. Kunz
    Charles M. Kunz at |

    Can they fix that obnoxious window spacing which means some “window” seats are not window seats? That would go a long way towards making them sexier

    Reply
    1. Raymond Kwan
      Raymond Kwan at |

      Even if they’re aligned, your eyes still need to be in your elbows to look out.

      Reply
  15. John Butler
    John Butler at |

    that sliding tray is just something that is going to break.

    Reply
  16. Michael J. Graven
    Michael J. Graven at |

    Make CRJ Great Again

    Reply
  17. Joel Anderson
    Joel Anderson at |

    Sexy and CRJ are two words that don’t belong in the same sentence.

    The only exception might be the Jazz CR-705’s.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Granzin
      Kevin Granzin at |

      So true.

      Remember when we were stuck on one together and hated it? ๐Ÿ˜–

      Reply
  18. Raymond Kwan
    Raymond Kwan at |

    Let people sit on the floor so they can look out the window?

    Reply
  19. Steven Sullivan
    Steven Sullivan at |

    The more I think about it, I’m really not sure how they can enlarge the bins enough to allow wheels-in first stowage of standard size rollaboards without reducing the already tight shoulder and head space above the aisle. It’s already such that some of us who are taller have to lean well out of the way to open and close the overhead bin doors without getting smacked in the face or head by the door. The only way I can see that they could achieve this would be to both lengthen the bins and lower their base some, so that there is a little less headroom above the seats – and then angle the bottom of the bins downward more. I’ve already had someone accidentally slam a bin door down on my head while standing in the aisle of a CR7 once during boarding. That problem is likely going to be worse on this version of the plane.

    Reply
    1. Joel Anderson
      Joel Anderson at |

      The CRJ-705 has a lower floor, IIRC. It’s been awhile since I’ve flown one, but I thought it had larger overhead bins on board than typical CRJ’s, however, still smaller than ERJ170/190’s.

      Reply
    2. Joel Anderson
      Joel Anderson at |

      The CRJ-705 has a lower floor, IIRC. It’s been awhile since I’ve flown one, but I thought it had larger overhead bins on board than typical CRJ’s, however, still smaller than ERJ170/190’s.

      Reply
    3. Steven Sullivan
      Steven Sullivan at |

      The CR7 and CR9 do have slightly lower floors, and, depending on when they were built, larger bins than the CR2. Sometime around 2009 Bombardier launched a “Next Gen” interior for the larger CRJs and Dash 8s, which has a somewhat larger bin. So, not all CR7s and CR9s have the same bins in them today – my 22″ Briggs & Riley bag will technically fit sideways in the Next Gen interior bins, but not the original ones (which are about the same size as a CRJ/CR2 bin), although it consumes pretty much the full bin if I do that. It’s those Next Gen interiors today that already feel very maxed out on bin size, with doors that can’t easily open or close with an aisle full of people because their heads are in the way of the door movement. To get a 22″ bag to stow wheels first is going to require a significant deepening of the bin, which probably means stealing some headroom in the aisle and above the seats, and angling the bins more than they already are. I’m just not sure that can be done in a way that doesn’t make the plane feel even more claustrophobic.

      Reply
    4. Steven Sullivan
      Steven Sullivan at |

      The CR7 and CR9 do have slightly lower floors, and, depending on when they were built, larger bins than the CR2. Sometime around 2009 Bombardier launched a “Next Gen” interior for the larger CRJs and Dash 8s, which has a somewhat larger bin. So, not all CR7s and CR9s have the same bins in them today – my 22″ Briggs & Riley bag will technically fit sideways in the Next Gen interior bins, but not the original ones (which are about the same size as a CRJ/CR2 bin), although it consumes pretty much the full bin if I do that. It’s those Next Gen interiors today that already feel very maxed out on bin size, with doors that can’t easily open or close with an aisle full of people because their heads are in the way of the door movement. To get a 22″ bag to stow wheels first is going to require a significant deepening of the bin, which probably means stealing some headroom in the aisle and above the seats, and angling the bins more than they already are. I’m just not sure that can be done in a way that doesn’t make the plane feel even more claustrophobic.

      Reply
    5. Steven Sullivan
      Steven Sullivan at |

      I’m also wondering if that wheels first arrangement is only for first class – not for economy – similar to how the EMB-170/175/190/195 is set up.

      Reply
    6. Steven Sullivan
      Steven Sullivan at |

      I’m also wondering if that wheels first arrangement is only for first class – not for economy – similar to how the EMB-170/175/190/195 is set up.

      Reply
  20. Alastair Majury
    Alastair Majury at |

    Looks like a very nice cabin for a CRJ, thanks for sharing. Regards, Alastair Majury

    Reply
  21. Kailash Nathan
    Kailash Nathan at |

    If it’s a private jet, it can be sexy

    Reply
    1. Joel Anderson
      Joel Anderson at |

      Eh, the challenger is my least favorite biz-jets. Loading and ride among other issues. I’ll take a Lear (anything other than a 35) or older Hawkers over one anyday.

      Reply

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