7 Responses

  1. Steven Sullivan
    Steven Sullivan at |

    It’s kind of amazing how much effort Bombardier has invested in trying to solve issues created by the too-narrow CRJ fuselage over the years. I wonder if anyone there actually regrets not going with an all new fuselage design when extending beyond 50 seats like Embraer did? I know most of us passengers certainly consider their decision to be a poor one.

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    1. Michael J. Graven
      Michael J. Graven at |

      Ours is not the opinion that matters, though.

      Riding an ERJ tomorrow.

      Reply
    2. Steven Sullivan
      Steven Sullivan at |

      Fortunately it’s pretty rare I’m on anything smaller than a 717. I think I made it through all of 2016 without flying anything smaller than a 717 on DL – and this year, I made it until just a few weeks ago. Since August 1 I’ve had a couple of CR7s and one CR9, but that’s it.

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    3. Michael J. Graven
      Michael J. Graven at |

      In 2007 or 2008, almost half my flights were on CRJ’s of one kind or another (mostly on US feeders out of DCA). When I did the stats at the end of the year, I foreswore it thereafter.

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    4. Steven Sullivan
      Steven Sullivan at |

      I had my share of those years – 2005 all the way until around 2012 I was pretty heavy on 50 seat RJs (mostly ERJ-145s) and turboprops. 2005-2010 I had a steady stream of clients in locations where it was all ERJ, all the time, and a few in places that were solely Saab 340 destinations. So, I got plenty of time on those planes, to the extent that one year I earned CO Platinum on SEGMENTS solely off my ERJ/prop flying. It has been a nice change to be pretty much all mainline all the time the past three years. I’ve not set foot on an ERJ-145 since late July 2014, and the only CRJ-200s I’ve flown since August 2014 were a pair of UAEX ones on SFO-RNO-SFO in May 2016. Otherwise, I’ve been free of the curse of 50 seat RJs.

      Reply
  2. Chris Rauschnot
    Chris Rauschnot at |

    I fly smaller jets often and gate-to-gate Wi-Fi would be fantastic. Commonly, the jet will be stuck on a runway for half of the time it should be in the air.

    Reply
  3. Alastair Majury
    Alastair Majury at |

    Thanks for sharing this update, regards Alastair Majury

    Reply

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