8 Responses

  1. 1971Thistle
    1971Thistle at |

    As a non US viewer, I found this hearing dispiriting.

    Boeing have clearly decided their ‘line to take’ designed to minimise any legal ramifications; protecting the compnay comes first. It was also clear their lobbying efforts were paying dividends.

    The line – which has been pursued from the outset – of blaming the poor piloting skills in other countries (and the subliminal patriotism behind bigging up the inherent superiority of American pilots) was unpleasant to behold.

    It reminds me of the banking crisis, where they were seen as ‘too big to fail’ and were therefore defended even when their role in precipitating the crisis was clear toa ll.

    Reply
    1. Christian
      Christian at |

      Well said. One repercussion that Boeing is overlooking by victim shaming the airlines that crashed and trying to share the blame with the FAA is the loss of business that will result. If a foreign buyer can’t trust Boeing and can’t trust the FAA, Airbus starts to look a whole lot better.

      Reply
  2. Robert
    Robert at |

    Thanks for watching C-SPAN so the rest of us don’t have to 🙂

    In all seriousness, I’m not sure how I feel about the pilot training issue. If the US clears a plane to fly then it would seem that every other nation that flies that plane have similar certification processes; is this not currently the case? At the bare minimum it would seem that an airline should have processes in place to train pilots to safely and correctly fly the plane type. The NTSB comments that Boeing needs to train to the lowest common denominator seems short sighted if the rest of the world assumes training based on US standards; and wouldn’t that then push the training blame squarely on the FAA rather than Boeing? I don’t know much of the whole story but it seems that either the FAA needs to demand better training standards (that would thus apply worldwide) OR any country/airline that buys a plane needs to thoroughly examine training and needs before allowing the plane to fly. And Boeing should have, it seems, made more notice of the change to the MAX operation vs past 737 models.

    Reply
  3. Karen
    Karen at |

    It should be noted that Mr. Elwell has been acting head of the FAA since Jan 6, 2018. The President just got around to naming Stephen Dickson to be permanent head of the FAA in March, almost 17 months after the previous director stepped down. Mr. Dickson is currently going through Senate confirmation hearings.

    Reply
  4. John Eogerson
    John Eogerson at |

    Wow. The only xenophobia is see in this article is from the author. It’s a fact most foreign countries have more lax training requirements for pilots. To make bigoted claims against the Boeing employees for pointing this out is a form of xenophobia.

    Reply
    1. 1971Thistle
      1971Thistle at |

      It’s a fact?

      Want to share your evidence for that?

      Reply

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.