Argentina’s Reciprocity Fee Suspended


I avoided the reciprocity fee in 2011; today all Americans can and far more easily!
I avoided the reciprocity fee in 2011; today all Americans can and far more easily!
I avoided the reciprocity fee in 2011; today all Americans can and far more easily!

Visiting Argentina just became less expensive for US Citizens. The “reciprocity fee” charged by Argentinian authorities for US passport holders to visit (so named because the US charges a similar fee for a visa interview of Argentines) will be waived going forward. The move was announced late last week and, while details are scant, appears to cover all visits up to 90 days in length for the foreseeable future.

In order to strengthen the relationship between Argentina and the United States of America, the Argentine Government has resolved to suspend the collection of the reciprocity fee from US passport holders who visit our country for less than 90 days, for tourist or business purposes.

Some have reported that the suspension of said fees is only for 90 day, similar to how Brazil is temporarily suspending visa requirements for the period surrounding the Olympics in an effort to bring in more visitors. That does not appear to be accurate based on a check of the TIMATIC system for visits at the end of 2016; so long as the trip is under 90 days the system indicates that no visa is required for such trips. Of course, the suspension of the fee could always be reinstated, changing the rules and requiring the $160 payment again. But, at least for now, it is gone and trips down south are going to be cheaper for Americans. Chile similarly removed its fee in 2014 though that was tied to Chileans gaining access to the US Visa Waiver Program. Argentinians did not gain such in this case.

To say nothing of the benefits the Blue Dollar exchange rates bring (though not nearly as good as they once were) and the fact that the local economy is teetering on its edge already. Airfares to Argentina have not collapsed quite as much as those to/from Brazil, but it is still a very, very attractive market for US visitors. And the removal of the reciprocity fee makes it even better.

Never miss another post: Sign up for email alerts and get only the content you want direct to your inbox.


Seth Miller

I'm Seth, also known as the Wandering Aramean. I was bit by the travel bug 30 years ago and there's no sign of a cure. I fly ~200,000 miles annually; these are my stories. You can connect with me on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and .
BoardingArea