14 Responses

  1. Brian Fisher
    Brian Fisher at |

    Both are pretty significant in their own respects. I have been watching the 10s on the flight line. I saw the Singapore bird parked at the delivery center yesterday evening on the way home from work. I so wish I could have gone to the ceremony. Pretty awesome to have a model that can only be assembled here. I thought that was because one of the sections was too large for the Dreamlifter, though I am sure the other financial considerations help as well.

    1. Seth Miller
      Seth Miller at |

      Agreed both are significant. Not sure either is a watershed moment for the industry as opposed to incremental improvements, but both worth knowing about.

  2. Sean M Ulvihill
    Sean M Ulvihill at |

    I think the non-stop UK-Oz isn’t that much of a big deal for passengers. Unless they live in, or travel to Perth, it’s just another one (or two) stop service to their destination.

    If I need to connect, it doesn’t matter where I do it.

    What’s significant is how many city pairs, worldwide, it has deemed itself worthy of flying… almost like a hub buster, so to speak.

    1. Seth Miller
      Seth Miller at |

      Completely agreed on the connection aspect. And there’s the part where, given a 24-26 hour trip, many (most??) passengers will choose a pair of 12 hour flights over 17 & 7.

      The 787 has definitely helped some airlines overfly hubs more than in the past. So has the A350. So with the A330neo and other future aircraft. Even the A321LR and 737MAX will deliver that, just on a smaller scale. But, even with the improved operating economics versus prior generations of planes, I’m not so convinced that the hub-and-spoke model is going to die. It is ridiculously efficient for many city pairings and takes advantage of the same lower operating costs for new generations of planes.

    2. Sean M Ulvihill
      Sean M Ulvihill at |

      Seth Miller , I’m on the same train of thought. I’m fine with the hubs. There’s usually more services, amenities, and certainly travelers are in better shape in/out of hubs in irregular operations.

      I just like the new thinking with these more efficient planes and how they are either more daring to try new routes, or that the numbers just justify them to the decision makers. Whatever the backroom causes are, I’m loving the effects.

    3. Seth Miller
      Seth Miller at |

      Me, too, Sean. Love all the new lines to collect. 😀

  3. Rosalyn Abramson
    Rosalyn Abramson at |

    Why Perth? Not a big population center, isolated and travelling east coast to west coast is not cheap in Oz.

    1. Seth Miller
      Seth Miller at |

      Because the plane can’t go any further without significant weight restrictions. The hope is to mostly pull west coast traffic, plus a bit of connection from the big cities out east. And potentially in a few years with another round of aircraft improvements maybe London to Sydney or Melbourne. But the current planes don’t have the range to make that financially viable.

    2. Idir Aitsahalia
      Idir Aitsahalia at |

      Perth is still a city of 2+ million people, has a lot of British expatriates, and pulls from the rest of Australia. The flight routes Melbourne-Perth-London anyways. About 60% of the traffic originates in Perth, 40% in the rest of Australia. I would imagine this flight would stay even after Qantas begins nonstop flights from the East Coast to London.

  4. Kush Patel
    Kush Patel at |

    You could almost say it was a triple Dreamliner Event across all three 787 varients with Air India flying over Saudi Arabia to arrive at Israel. Though that was more diplomacy than 787 tech…

  5. Idir Aitsahalia
    Idir Aitsahalia at |

    QF flying nonstop to the UK is a big deal. The 787-10 isn’t a major game changer. Of course it is more fuel-efficient and will help airlines cut costs, but it won’t make plenty of new routes possible as the 787-8 and 787-9 due given its larger size and shorter range.

    1. Seth Miller
      Seth Miller at |

      But how big a deal is it? From a passenger perspective how many really save time?

      Agreed that the -10 doesn’t open new routes. But it does shave costs on existing ones.

    2. Idir Aitsahalia
      Idir Aitsahalia at |

      For 787s look at how UA has been using each variant. 787-8 opens smaller long-haul routes like DEN-NRT, SFO-CTU, SFO-PPT. 787-9 opens ultra-long-haul routes like SFO-SIN, LAX-SIN< IAH-SYD. 787-10 will mostly replace older 777s and 767s on core transatlantic routes.