Where to sit on the Delta A220


The 2-3 layout in economy on Delta's A220 offers some flexibility in seating options
The 2-3 layout in economy on Delta's A220 offers some flexibility in seating options

Delta’s new A220-100 entered service this week and thus far delivers on all the promises made. It is quiet inside. It offers wider seats and a mostly awesome new take on the in-seat entertainment system. Plus high speed wifi that delivers the speeds promised. But, like all planes, not all seats are create equally. Here are some thoughts on which are best based on my experiences during the first day of commercial service.

First Class

Yes, first class is better. But even among the 2-2 layout there are some seats which are better than others.

Row 1 on the Delta A220 loses out on the foot space challenge of a bulkhead row. Plus, a slightly missing window on the A side.
Row 1 on the Delta A220 loses out on the foot space challenge of a bulkhead row. Plus, a slightly missing window on the A side.

I hate to say it, but avoiding the bulkhead is probably a smart idea. The IFE screen is a little smaller but, more importantly, the foot room just isn’t the same. No cutout in the bulkhead really leaves passengers more cramped than the rows behind. If forced into row one consider that 1A only has one window while 1D (and all the other window seats) has two available.

Plenty of knee and foot room in first class on the Delta A220, so long as you skip the bulkhead row.
Plenty of knee and foot room in first class on the Delta A220, so long as you skip the bulkhead row.


Comfort Plus

Grab yourself some extra legroom (DL says 34″ pitch) in these seats. With only three rows of C+ seating on board there aren’t a lot of options nor variation among the seats.

Decent knee room in the Delta A220 ComfortPlus section; the company calls it 34" pitch.
Decent knee room in the Delta A220 ComfortPlus section; the company calls it 34″ pitch.

The two-seat side is likely to be more comfortable in most cases but no guarantees. Row 10 delivers a tiny bit more legroom but with the downside of awkward underseat storage owing to the lineup of the first class cabin ahead of it. Plus, the screens are in the armrest so no moving map at takeoff and landing. But if you can put all your stuff overhead 10C gets extra space with the aisle shifting around it into first class.

The first row of Comfort+ has a little extra legroom but the occasionally dreaded screen-in-armrest setup
The first row of Comfort+ has a little extra legroom but the occasionally dreaded screen-in-armrest setup


Economy Class

One of the best things about the A220 is that the economy cabin is surprisingly comfortable. With 32″ pitch and an 18″+ seat width, large IFE screens and power available to everyone there aren’t a ton of bad seats on board. There are a couple pretty good ones, though.

Not gratuitous, but still decent knee room on the Delta A220. Some of the best pitch in the US market right now.
Not gratuitous, but still decent knee room on the Delta A220. Some of the best pitch in the US market right now.
A pair of 110V power outlets for every triplet of seats on the Delta A220. And pretty easy to access as well.
A pair of 110V power outlets for every triplet of seats on the Delta A220. And pretty easy to access as well.

At the exit row, for example, seats 16E offers “unlimited” legroom owing to the lack of seat directly in front of it at the exit. Seats 15A/B offer increased space on the other side of the aisle.

But 15C/D are pretty tight. They looked a little more cramped than the regular economy seats, even though they’re adjacent to the exit. But they’re also not marked as exit seats on the map.

This is the exit row seating on the C/D/E side. Only 16E gets extra legroom.
This is the exit row seating on the C/D/E side. Only 16E gets extra legroom.
Grab 15A/B if you want a pair of exit row seats together
Grab 15A/B if you want a pair of exit row seats together

At the far back of the cabin the galley & lavs are a relatively normal setup for a single-aisle aircraft. There’s an added complexity on the A220 though, at least in the near term. The port side lav has a window inside, a “loo with a view” as the hashtag world has deemed it. While this is not unique in the aviation world it is relatively new to North America and the lines for people working on their laviator selfie were noticeable on day one of operations. That will likely dissipate pretty quickly but, well, it is a thing that created some extra queuing at the back of the plane.

Is this the best seat in economy?? That window is pretty cool.
Is this the best seat in economy?? That window is pretty cool.

That said, other than the lav lines the seats at the back aren’t all that bad. They aren’t appreciably louder than those up front, unlike on many other planes. The last couple overhead bins are used for company storage, though, so don’t expect to have those available for your bags in rows 27-29.

But, seriously, the most spacious economy class seat might be that lav, especially since it has a window!

Yeah, the lav window on the Delta A220 is fun. Presumably people will get over that eventually. Maybe.
Yeah, the lav window on the Delta A220 is fun. Presumably people will get over that eventually. Maybe.

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Seth Miller

I'm Seth, also known as the Wandering Aramean. I was bit by the travel bug 30 years ago and there's no sign of a cure. I fly ~200,000 miles annually; these are my stories. You can connect with me on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and .

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